Extended time limits before the EUIPO and EPO because of the COVID-19

face-mask-4890115_1920Taking into account the dissemination of COVID-19 in the EU and its declaration as a pandemic, the European Intellectual Property Office (EUIPO) took a decision to extend all tome limits regarding different trademark and design procedures. According to the announcement:

The Executive Director of the EUIPO has today (16 March) signed a decision extending all time limits expiring between 9 March 2020 and 30 April 2020, that affect all parties before the Office, to 1 May 2020. In practice, this means that time limits are extended until Monday 4 May, given that Friday 1 May is a public holiday.

Similar decision was taken by the EPO too.

 

The European Patent Office is ready to issue Unitary EU patents

european-union-1328255_1280The European Patent Office expressed its readiness to issue the so-called  Unitary EU patents.

The Unitary Patent is a patent granted by the EPO for which unitary effect can be registered with the EPO for the territory of the participating EU Member States.  This patent is crucial for competitiveness, growth, and innovation in Europe.

For the time being, the Unitary Patent is not officially in action because of a lawsuit before the German Supreme Court, which has to decide whether this patent protection is in line with the German constitution.

Another uncertainty is what will happen with the UK after Brexit. The problem arises from the fact that the British government is against any possibilities where the European Court can have jurisdiction over the UK even in the case of the Unitary Patent.

For more information here.

The brand new version of Espacenet is available

The European Patent Office announced the brand new version of its patent database Espacenet.

The new version is more modern and dynamic and at the same time allows searching for patent documentation based on different combinations of terms and filters.

In addition, the database will provide its users with better translations of the patent documentation in more languages.

For more information here.

EPO launched a new beta version of ESPACENET

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The European Patent Office launched the beta version of its refreshing database for patent searching ESPACENET. The new version is more modern, dynamic, intuitive and it is optimised to work on different devices including desktop PCs, tablets and smartphones.

The beta version is accessible here. For more information about it, you can watch the hereunder video presentation. EPO encourages sending feedback, which can be done from here.

Are we on the verge of a new transport revolution?

auto-2651594_960_720.pngAccording to the European Patent Office, we will face a new transport revolution soon considering patent filing trends. Statistics show that there is 330% growth of patent applications related to autonomous driving vehicles between 2011 and 2017. For comparasion, the growth for all other technologies for the same period is 16%.

Curious or not, the applicants of these patents are not only the automobile companies but different tech companies too. The biggest applicants in that regard are Samsung (624 patent filings), followed by Intel (590), Qualcomm (361), LG (348), and Bosch (343).

For more information here.

 

When AI can be protected by patents?

robot-1797548_960_720Darren Hau (Marks & Clerk) published an interesting article for Lexology which discusses the topic for patent protection of Artificial Intelligence (AI).

As it is well known, computer programs and mathematical methods are excluded from patent protection because it requires a technical solution of a technical problem.

The main question here is, however, when one software, including AI, meets these requirements, that is to say when it has a concrete technical effect.

The updated EPO “Guidelines for Examination”  gives some tips in that regard.

When it comes to AI inventions, the guidelines provide the following as examples of technical applications:

  • control of a specific technical system/process;
  • encryption/decryption or signing electronic communications;
  • audio/image/video enhancement or analysis;
  • speech recognition, e.g. mapping a speech input to a text output;
  • etc.

The natural conclusion from an in-depth analysis of these examples is that AI is protectable by patents in a case that it claims are restricted to specific technical purposes or such technical implementations.

The full article can be found here.

Brief IP news

briefs_1131. CJEU in C-395/16, Doceram vs. CeramTec, interprets the concept of technically required features of appearance excluded from protection under Community designs Regulation. For more information here.

2. Colour it mine: protecting colour trademarks. For more information here.

3.  Euro-PCT Guide: PCT procedure at the EPO. For more information here.

Source: Intellectual Property Center at the UNWE. More information can be found here